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maha.

20.

egyptian.

living in the chi.

cardozzza:

Privileged people preaching nonviolence to oppressed people
Is violence

lilpunkin:

i feel like every single boy is a fuckboy. i feel like theres a fuckboy scale that goes from 1 to 10 that every single boy falls on. it’s not a question of whether a boy is a fuckboy or not but rather how bad of a fuckboy he is

Today in Solidarity (10.13.14): From Ferguson to Palestine, the revolution has arrived. In the early days of the protests in Ferguson, it was Palestinians who first reached out to offer guidance and wisdom in how to combat police brutality. What has flourished in the time since is one of the truest manifestations of global solidarity I’ve ever witnessed. This is how a moment becomes a movement. #staywoke #fergusonoctober #revolution.

Things I Don't Remember
Ugly Casanova
Sharpen Your Teeth
134 plays

a-different-kind-of-tune:

Things I Don’t Remember - Ugly Casanova 

blackdenimjeans:

*me talking to my spouse or whatever in 20 years* do you know how lucky you are that I’m with you

thedebonairgentlequeer:

you’re not a burden. 

you’re not a burden. 

you’re not a burden.

ok i get it now- everyone wants to fuck the brown girl but no ones wants actually to date her. ok. cool.

keywrites:

ja-ll:

rstarlings:

Ahead of Toronto’s upcoming municipal elections, Ward 2 candidate Munira Abukar has been the target of racial hatred and vandalism. City councillors, members of the public, and other candidates have outwardly shown support for her on Twitter, including mayoral candidate Olivia Chow (who has herself been the target of racism and threats of violence on a large scale).

#IStandWithMunira trended city-wide last night, and you can donate to her campaign here to help replace the signs and pictures that have been destroyed. x

Some examples of the bigotry and racism happening right now in Toronto. Some responses. 

My City Fails me and my sisters today, and yesterday and tomorrow.

“I am that clumsy human, always loving, loving, loving. And loving. And never leaving.”
Frida Kahlo (via wyldflowers)
zuky:

thesmithian:


…[some] may not remember what made Iran-Contra such an extraordinary scandal. The Reagan administration “raised money privately” by selling weapons to a sworn enemy of the United States. Why? Because it wanted to fund an illegal war in Nicaragua. And when I say “illegal war,” I mean that quite literally—Congress told the Reagan administration, in no uncertain terms, that Reagan could not send money to the Contras. Period. The Reagan administration, unrestrained by laws and the Constitution, did so anyway, and much of the president’s national security team ended up under indictment.

more.

Reagan knew everything. However, I bet this Time magazine piece doesn’t get into the juiciest part of Iran-Contra, which is that in the 1980s the CIA put into operation a crack cocaine pipeline to import narcotics from Central and South America and distribute it in US inner cities. This is not a “conspiracy theory”, this is a documented conspiracy, most rigorously researched and reported by Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Gary Webb, whose series in the San Jose Mercury News and subsequent book “Dark Alliance” literally got him killed. To me, that’s the story of Iran-Contra: not that Reagan sold weapons to Iran, but that the US government imported and sold crack to Black America, as part of an arms and drugs trade which funded war in the Third World and which devastated lives and filled prisons in the USA.

zuky:

thesmithian:

…[some] may not remember what made Iran-Contra such an extraordinary scandal. The Reagan administration “raised money privately” by selling weapons to a sworn enemy of the United States. Why? Because it wanted to fund an illegal war in Nicaragua. And when I say “illegal war,” I mean that quite literally—Congress told the Reagan administration, in no uncertain terms, that Reagan could not send money to the Contras. Period. The Reagan administration, unrestrained by laws and the Constitution, did so anyway, and much of the president’s national security team ended up under indictment.

more.

Reagan knew everything. However, I bet this Time magazine piece doesn’t get into the juiciest part of Iran-Contra, which is that in the 1980s the CIA put into operation a crack cocaine pipeline to import narcotics from Central and South America and distribute it in US inner cities. This is not a “conspiracy theory”, this is a documented conspiracy, most rigorously researched and reported by Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Gary Webb, whose series in the San Jose Mercury News and subsequent book “Dark Alliance” literally got him killed. To me, that’s the story of Iran-Contra: not that Reagan sold weapons to Iran, but that the US government imported and sold crack to Black America, as part of an arms and drugs trade which funded war in the Third World and which devastated lives and filled prisons in the USA.

marxvx:

when people say that raising the minimum wage will hurt workers because of layoffs or inflation they’re really just admitting that capitalism is structurally unable to provide an adequate standard of living for the working class

magnifiquementtragique:

silversarcasm:

if you had to drop out of a class you are not a failure

if you had to take time off school you are not a failure

if you had to leave school for good you are not a failure

your worth is not determined by academia and this goes doubly so for disabled people and others for whom school is set against them

thank you. i especially needed to hear this today.

“The term “model minority” came about in the 1960s in newspaper and magazine accounts of perceived Japanese American and Chinese American socioeconomic success. High levels of educational achievement, low rates of mental disorder and criminality, and job mobility were used as factors to measure this success. Subsequently, it was extended to Asian Americans as a whole. Characteristics attributed to the model minority-of hard work, thrift, family cohesion, deference to authority were explained by pointing to an undifferentiated, essentialized notion of “Asian culture.” These Asian values, it was argued, while still alien, were highly compatible with Anglo-American values, especially the Protestant work ethic. How did Asians, who had historically been subject to immigration exclusion, political disenfranchisement, various forms of discrimination, and physical violence as the “yellow peril,” become the model minority, seemingly overnight? Turning to the domestic and international historical context at this time sheds light on the apparent shift. In the 1960s, African Americans were actively challenging institutional racism through the civil rights struggle. The figure of the Asian American model minority was constructed as a conservative backlash against these activists, who were deemed to be unruly and underachieving. African Americans were told that if Asian Americans could succeed, why couldn’t they? A U.S. News and World Report article in 1966 presented a progressive account of the history of Asians in the United States, the road “from hardship and discrimination to become a model of self-respect and achievement in today’s America.” Asian American “success” was used as evidence to support the claim that American liberalism could indeed function as a multiracial democracy. Therefore, if the system is not flawed, it was argued, the fault must somehow lie with the African Americans themselves. If African Americans “worked” as hard as the Asian Americans, then surely they could become model minorities as well. Indeed, as reported by U.S. News and World Report, “At a time when it is being propose that hundreds of billions be spent to uplift Negroes and other minorities, the nation’s 300,000 Chinese-Americans are moving ahead on their own-with no help from anyone else.” So the figure of the model minority was less about Asian Americans per se and more a lesson to be learned by African Americans and a deflection away from the focus on the problem of institutional racism and racial inequality. It attempted to sublate the contradictions of the U.S. nationstate. Such a deflection was necessary not only for domestic race relations, but for Cold War international geopolitical relations as well. In the Cold War battle against communist totalitarianism, the United States was very concerned about its international image and sought to counter and mitigate charges of racism.”